What Is The Cause And Effect Of Polio?

Can you still get polio?

Polio does still exist, although polio cases have decreased by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated more than 350 000 cases to 22 reported cases in 2017.

This reduction is the result of the global effort to eradicate the disease..

What animal did polio come from?

The discovery by Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper in 1908 that polio was caused by a virus, a discovery made by inoculating macaque monkeys with an extract of nervous tissue from polio victims that was shown to be free of other infectious agents.

How many times should Polio be given?

OPV is the WHO-recommended vaccine for the global eradication of polio. Each child requires just two drops per dose to be immunized against polio. Usually administered four times if the EPI schedule is followed, OPV is safe and effective in providing protection against the paralyzing poliovirus.

How is polio diagnosed?

Doctors often recognize polio by symptoms, such as neck and back stiffness, abnormal reflexes, and difficulty swallowing and breathing. To confirm the diagnosis, a sample of throat secretions, stool or a colorless fluid that surrounds your brain and spinal cord (cerebrospinal fluid) is checked for poliovirus.

What famous person had polio?

President Franklin D. RooseveltAmong the famous survivors of polio are President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who contracted polio in 1921 at the age of 39 and used a wheelchair thereafter, though he attempted to hide his paralysis during public appearances.

What is the effect of polio?

Polio is a viral disease which may affect the spinal cord causing muscle weakness and paralysis. The polio virus enters the body through the mouth, usually from hands contaminated with the stool of an infected person.

Can polio affect you later in life?

Symptoms vary from mild, flu-like symptoms to paralysis and possibly death. People who have had polio may experience effects later in life called the late effects of polio. The late effects of polio are when physical symptoms return 15 years or more after the first polio infection.

When did they stop giving polio vaccine?

OPV was recommended for use in the United States for almost 40 years, from 1963 until 2000. The results have been miraculous: Polio was eliminated from the United States in 1979 and from the Western Hemisphere in 1991. Since 2000, only IPV is recommended to prevent polio in the United States.

Why did polio spread so easily?

The polio virus usually enters the environment in the feces of someone who is infected. In areas with poor sanitation, the virus easily spreads from feces into the water supply, or, by touch, into food. In addition, because polio is so contagious, direct contact with a person infected with the virus can cause polio.

When was polio at its worst?

At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, polio would paralyze or kill over half a million people worldwide every year.

Is polio a man made disease?

The creation of the man-made polio virus came just a month after the World Health Organization had declared polio eradicated from Europe and projected total eradication of the disease by 2005. Last year, only 480 cases were reported in the world.

What does Polio do to muscles?

When it multiplies in the nervous system, the virus can destroy nerve cells (motor neurons) which activate skeletal muscles. These nerve cells cannot regenerate, and the affected muscles lose their function due to a lack of nervous enervation – a condition known as acute flaccid paralysis (AFP).

What are the symptoms of post polio?

What are the symptoms of post-polio syndrome?Progressive weakness (common)Tiredness (fatigue) (common)Pain in the muscles and joints (common)Muscle shrinkage.Trouble swallowing.Breathing problems.Sleep disorders.Sensitivity to cold temperatures.

What is polio how it is caused?

Polio, or poliomyelitis, is a disabling and life-threatening disease caused by the poliovirus. The virus spreads from person to person and can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis (can’t move parts of the body).

How is polio treated today?

Once the virus that causes polio has infected a person, there is no treatment that will cure polio. Early diagnosis and supportive treatments such as bed rest, pain control, good nutrition, and physical therapy to prevent deformities from occurring over time can help reduce the long-term symptoms due to muscle loss.

Can you still get polio if vaccinated?

No, thanks to a successful vaccination program, the United States has been polio-free for more than 30 years, but the disease still occurs in other parts of the world. It would only take one person with polio traveling from another country to bring polio back to the United States.

What stopped polio?

Several key strategies have been outlined for stopping polio transmission: High infant immunization coverage with four doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the first year of life in developing and endemic countries, and routine immunization with OPV and/or IPV elsewhere.

Why is polio still in Pakistan?

Pakistan is considered as the exporter of Wild Polio Virus (WPV) with highest number of polio outbreaks among endemic countries. … The misconception of people about polio vaccine, insecurity within the country and poor health system are the reasons of failure of polio eradication campaigns in these regions.

Where did polio originally come from?

1894, first outbreak of polio in epidemic form in the U.S. occurs in Vermont, with 132 cases. 1908, Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper identify a virus as the cause of polio by transmitting the disease to a monkey.

How can polio be prevented?

Polio can be prevented by immunizing a child with approrpiate vaccination. There are currently two effective polio vaccines, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and the live attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV).

How many cases of polio are there in 2019?

To date, there have been 94 wild poliovirus cases reported in 2019, compared to 33 in all of 2018. In addition, several African nations reported single cases of vaccine-derived polio: Chad, Benin, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Ethiopia, Togo, and Zambia.