Quick Answer: Can A Viral Sinus Infection Cause A Fever?

How long can you have a fever with a sinus infection?

When to see your doctor for sinus infection Make an appointment with your doctor if you have a fever, nasal discharge, congestion, or facial pain that lasts longer than ten days or keeps coming back..

How long does it take for a viral sinus infection to go away?

Viral sinus infections are usually most severe three to six days after they start, and then begin to improve by day 10. A viral sinus infection can develop into a bacterial infection, which typically lasts longer than 10 days.

Why won’t my sinus infection go away with antibiotics?

A bacterial or viral infection can also trigger the condition. The infection is often low grade. The bacteria confine themselves in stubborn “biofilms,” making it difficult for your immune system or antibiotics to find and attack them.

Can a sinus infection go away without antibiotics?

About 70 percent of sinus infections go away within two weeks without antibiotics. Consider these other forms of treatments instead of antibiotics: Decongestants. These medications are available for over-the-counter purchase.

What are the symptoms of a viral sinus infection?

Symptoms of sinusitis (sinus infection)Yellow or green nasal discharge.A blocked or runny nose.Pain and tenderness around the affected sinuses (commonly less severe in chronic sinusitis)Sinus pressure.Fever (above 38 C / 100.4 F)Toothache.A reduced sense of smell (most common in chronic sinusitis)Bad breath.

How can you tell the difference between a viral and bacterial sinus infection?

A viral sinus infection will usually start to improve after five to seven days. A bacterial sinus infection will often persist for seven to 10 days or longer, and may actually worsen after seven days.

Can the flu cause a sinus infection?

Even if you’re usually healthy, the flu can knock you off your feet for days — even weeks. And it doesn’t always happen, but there’s a chance that it could lead to more serious health problems, or “complications,” like sinusitis (sinus infections), bronchitis, or pneumonia.

What antibiotic is for sinus infection?

Amoxicillin (Amoxil) is acceptable for uncomplicated acute sinus infections; however, many doctors prescribe amoxicillin-clavulanate (Augmentin) as the first-line antibiotic to treat a possible bacterial infection of the sinuses. Amoxicillin usually is effective against most of the strains of bacteria.

Is viral sinusitis contagious?

Viruses cause most sinus infections. If a virus causes your sinus infection, then it can be contagious. Spreading the virus to another person doesn’t guarantee that person will get a sinus infection. In most cases, they may only develop a cold.

Do I need antibiotics for sinus infection?

Your doctor will determine if you have a sinus infection by asking about symptoms and doing a physical examination. Antibiotics are not needed for many sinus infections. Most sinus infections usually get better on their own without antibiotics.

How do you get rid of a viral sinus infection?

But there are some things you can do to try to speed up the recovery process.Drink plenty of water. … Eat foods with antibacterial properties. … Add moisture. … Clear the sinuses with oils. … Use a neti pot. … Ease facial pain with warm compresses. … Use over-the-counter (OTC) medications. … Get a prescription.More items…

How long are you contagious when you have a sinus infection?

How Long Is It Contagious? If a virus is to blame, you may have been contagious days before you got the sinus infection. Most viruses can be spread for just a few days, but sometimes you could pass it on for a week or more.

What viruses cause sinusitis?

Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis.

What percentage of sinus infections are viral?

The most common cause of acute sinusitis is a viral infection associated with the common cold. This condition is also called viral sinusitis. Bacterial sinusitis occurs much less commonly, in only 0.5 to 2 percent of cases, usually as a complication of viral sinusitis.