How Long Does It Take To Recover From Polio?

When was polio at its worst?

At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, polio would paralyze or kill over half a million people worldwide every year..

What does bulbar polio do to you?

In bulbar polio the virus attacks the brainstem, and the nerve centres that control swallowing and talking are damaged. Secretions collect in the throat and may lead to suffocation by blocking the airway. Some 5 to 10 percent of persons afflicted with paralytic polio die, usually…

Is Post Polio Syndrome painful?

Muscle and joint pain are also common in post-polio syndrome. Muscle pain is usually felt as a deep ache in the muscles or muscle cramps and spasms. The pain is often worse after you’ve used the affected muscles. It can be particularly troublesome during the evening after a day’s activities.

How long is polio contagious for?

When and for how long is a person able to spread polio? Patients are most infectious from seven to ten days before and after the onset of symptoms. However, patients are potentially contagious as long as the virus is present in the throat and feces.

Where did polio originally come from?

Like a horror movie, throughout the first half of the 20th century, the polio virus arrived each summer, striking without warning. No one knew how polio was transmitted or what caused it. There were wild theories that the virus spread from imported bananas or stray cats. There was no known cure or vaccine.

What famous person had polio?

President Franklin D. RooseveltAmong the famous survivors of polio are President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who contracted polio in 1921 at the age of 39 and used a wheelchair thereafter, though he attempted to hide his paralysis during public appearances.

How many polio survivors are left?

The World Health Organization estimates that 10 to 20 million polio survivors are alive worldwide, and some estimates suggest that 4 to 8 million of them may get PPS.

What animal did polio come from?

The discovery by Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper in 1908 that polio was caused by a virus, a discovery made by inoculating macaque monkeys with an extract of nervous tissue from polio victims that was shown to be free of other infectious agents.

What does Polio do to muscles?

When it multiplies in the nervous system, the virus can destroy nerve cells (motor neurons) which activate skeletal muscles. These nerve cells cannot regenerate, and the affected muscles lose their function due to a lack of nervous enervation – a condition known as acute flaccid paralysis (AFP).

How quickly does polio affect the body?

Even children who seem to fully recover can develop new muscle pain, weakness, or paralysis as adults, 15 to 40 years later. This is called post-polio syndrome.

What are the after effects of polio?

Common signs and symptoms of post-polio syndrome include:Progressive muscle and joint weakness and pain.General fatigue and exhaustion with minimal activity.Muscle atrophy.Breathing or swallowing problems.Sleep-related breathing disorders, such as sleep apnea.Decreased tolerance of cold temperatures.

How long do polio survivors live?

For years, most polio survivors lived active lives, their memory of polio mainly forgotten, their health status stable. But by the late 1970s, survivors who were 20 or more years past their original diagnosis began noting new problems, including fatigue, pain, breathing or swallowing problems, and additional weakness.

Can you catch polio from swimming?

We now know that polio is spread through a fecal-oral contact route, and almost always through contaminated water.

How old is the oldest polio survivor?

Loraine Allen may be the oldest survivor of polio in the U.S. Allen is 97.